Eight Games That Really Should Get a Sequel

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While it’s common for sequels not to be as good as the games they follow, when it comes to titles we love, we can’t help but want more of them.

There are exceptions of course – Street Fighter 2 is way better than Street Fighter 1 for example, and Grand Theft Auto manages to be just as good as it ever was after several iterations. And while there are franchises that see a new game every year or two, there are a lot of excellent titles seemingly left in the dark. Here are eight games that we’d love to see get sequels.

Primal

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Anyone that knows me knows that I’m someone who puts gameplay above story in almost every single case. There are exceptions, however, and one of them is the 2003 PS2 exclusive Primal which is, to this day, one of the most criminally underrated and underplayed games of all time. The gameplay is relatively simple in its combat mechanics, but it also features puzzle solving that genuinely requires the player to think things through, use the environment and switch between characters in a unique spin on simulating cooperative gameplay in a single player format. It’s not the most challenging game, sure, but it also manages to tell one of my favourite game stories.

As Jen, a human and demon hybrid, you’re pulled into the world of Oblivion as the two rulers, Arella (Order) and Abaddon (Chaos) vie for control. Throughout the story, Jen and Cree must interact with citizens of the four realms of Oblivion, resolve their conflicts and restore order Each realm has a interesting story of its own and as you progress through the story, Jen and Scree form a bond that is conveyed excellently through the performances of both actors. Considering its 15 years old, Primal still looks pretty impressive and has huge worlds to explore. It’s a game I revisit often and would love to see what a current gen sequel could bring to the table.


Alpha Protocol

Obsidian’s Alpha Protocol promised a Mass Effect-style RPG set in a world of spies. Unfortunately, publisher Sega released the game before it was ready and as a result, the launch version of the game wasn’t polished and received mediocre reviews as a result, essentially killing any franchise potential it had. However, Obsidian supported the game post launch, patching many of the game’s issues, leaving a very good game that wasn’t the hit it could have been.

Still, Alpha Protocol has a lot of interesting things going on in it, and the spy angle is one that still hasn’t been explored since in the RPG genre. The systems in place tie in well to the themes of spies, espionage and action making for a game that could have been expanded quite well in sequels, however, Sega owns the IP and since the game didn’t sell well (surprise!) no sequel has come out.