God’s Trigger Review

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A demon and an angel teaming up to prevent the apocalypse isn’t the most original story in the world. But then God’s Trigger isn’t the type of game you play for its story.

A top-down action game that’s just as happy with you slaughtering enemies left, right and centre with melee attacks as it is with you using guns, crossbows and anything else you can propel at your foes, God’s Trigger is all about the art of killing. Throughout its five chapter campaign you’ll take in its pulpy yarn for sure, but you’ll always be itching to get back into the action.

With its twin-stick controls, God’s Trigger is easy to get into but hard to master. Like Hotline Miami, a combo multiplier rewards you for killing enemies quickly one after another. But also like Hotline Miami, all it takes it for your killing spree to be over is one blow. Thankfully, however, God’s Trigger is much more lenient with dealing with death. Instead of having to start at the beginning of the level again, you’ll simply be taken back to the last checkpoint, which are generously laid out. In God’s Trigger, death is rarely a frustration; it’s more of an opportunity to try a new approach.

And there are plenty of approaches you can take. Each of the two playable characters has their own unique melee attack, as well as a dash that allows them to move through the environment in a helpful way. On top of that, the game has an experience system, and upon levelling up new skills are unlocked which can also be upgraded. And those who scour each of the game’s levels might happen upon a number of perks, of which one can be equipped to tweak your playstyle just that little bit further.

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When playing alone, you can switch between the two available characters at will, which is very handy when you want to make use of their unique skills. Harry, for example, can become invisible, which is great for catching enemies unawares. Judy, on the other hand, can remotely bend an enemy to her will, making them attack their friends for a short period of time. And they’re just the most basic of skills available. Where God’s Trigger really shines, though, is in co-op.

Unfortunately only local co-op is available, but it’s perhaps understandable given the fast-paced and twitch-heavy nature of the gameplay. You really wouldn’t want to play God’s Trigger with any lag. In any case, with a friend or family member by your side, God’s Trigger is great. You take control of a sole character in co-op, and so must work together to navigate environments filled with traps while also effectively dealing the enemies thrown your way.

If a player dies, the other player has a short window in which to revive them. To prevent the game from being a cakewalk in co-op though, reviving your companion costs a healing syringe, and there are only so many available in each level. If both players die, it’s back to the last checkpoint you go. God’s Trigger does a great job of balancing its single player and co-op play. Neither feels that much easier or harder than the other. It simply feels like a different experience.

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God’s Trigger‘s campaign is likely to take you just under ten hours to complete, and if you’ve missed any of the collectable magazines or perks along the way you’ll probably return for more. There’s also an arcade mode that presents you with a unique selection of levels which you can tackle time and time again to improve your high score. It’s a great place to hone your skills and power up your characters, as any experience you earn is shared between modes.

Honestly, there’s not really anything to dislike about God’s Trigger. It’s up there with the likes of Hotline Miami and Mr Shifty when it comes to providing exhilarating top-down action, and it has also got a great soundtrack. Coming straight out of nowhere, it’s undoubtedly one of the best games released this year, and is an absolute must for anyone who loves local co-op. The icing on the cake is that at £11.99, it’s quite cheap too.

God’s Trigger is available on PS4, Xbox One and PC. We reviewed the Xbox One version.